Johnny Fox

After graduation, Johnny worked in the professional theatre for almost three weeks before discovering there was no money in it, and pursued instead a successful career designing interiors for investment banks, working in New York, Singapore and Moscow. Now back in the theatrical saddle and happily home in London, he’s reviewed for Whatsonstage.com and writes regularly for Londonist. He acts ‘sporadically’ most recently in a Radio 4 play and a dramatized documentary for National Geographic TV, but as a singer he’s notched up performances in Carnegie Hall, Royal Festival Hall, and Sydney Opera House. His wider interests include architecture, food+wine, travel, photography, transport and politics.
Always Look On The Bright Side Of Life: Candide at the Menier Chocolate Factory

The Menier does it again with a rollicking production of Candide that carries you along on a tidal wave of sumptuous ensemble singing: a grand and glorious romp for the Christmas season.

Sunday 8th December 2013 Read more...
Theatre Profile: The Park Theatre

Today we shine the spotlight on one of the newest additions to London's Off West End theatre scene, as our reviewer Johnny Fox waxes lyrical about the Park Theatre. Vote for your own favourite Off West End theatre below!

Thursday 5th December 2013 Read more...
Middle Class Mommie Dearest: That Face at the Landor Theatre

19-year old Polly Stenham's début play blew the critics away at the Royal Court in 2007. With a less TV-starred cast it's given an impressive and intimate 80-minute staging at the Landor but may leave you hoping for an equally brilliant second act. At the Landor Theatre

Sunday 17th November 2013 Read more...
Cry Me A Liver: Passing By at the Tristan Bates Theatre

Martin Sherman's early 70s "gay play" about hepatitis may have lain in a drawer for forty years but Andrew Keates' revival is most fascinating for its historical perspective, even if it drags a bit. At the Tristan Bates Theatre.

Saturday 9th November 2013 Read more...
Damp Bonfire Night of the Vanities: Keeler at the Charing Cross Theatre

Christine Keeler famously sat astride an Arne Jacobsen chair but this performance is also 100% plywood.  The script needs a blue pencil and producer Paul Nicholas needs to light the blue touch paper because what could have been a firecracker of a story ends up as Bridget Jones' Self-Pitying Diary of 1963.

Thursday 7th November 2013 Read more...
Love in two cold climates: The Pride at Trafalgar Studios

Alexei Kaye-Campbell’s searching and emotionally-charged play split nimbly between two tempores and mores gets a compelling staging and three immaculate central performances at Trafalgar Studios.

Monday 19th August 2013 Read more...
Climb Ev'ry Gangway: The Sound of Music at Regent's Park Open Air Theatre

The ghost of Julie Andrews certainly doesn't haunt the trees and glades of Regent's Park in Rachel Kavanaugh's freshly-laundered production of The Sound of Music. At the Regent's Park Open Air Theatre.

Thursday 8th August 2013 Read more...
"That Old Black Magic" doesn't quite work: The Color Purple at the Menier Chocolate Factory

Go to The Color Purple for eighteen outstanding, note-perfect soul voices: but the saccharine sentimentality, forgettable score and simplified script may leave you wishing for a less-sung, more dramatic stage version. At the Menier Chocolate Factory.

Thursday 18th July 2013 Read more...
What becomes a legend most? Patti LuPone at Leicester Square Theatre

Few performers can hold a note, or a grudge, as long as Patti LuPone. America’s most consummate of singers and fiercest of stage divas reveals both her soft side and her enduring distaste for Andrew Lloyd Webber in an extensive and engaging evening of anecdote and performance. At the Leicester Square Theatre.

Tuesday 18th June 2013 Read more...
Man Up And Do Showtunes: The West End Men at the Vaudeville Theatre

Promoted as a quartet of male headliners singing songs excised from the musicals they were written for, The West End Men quickly degenerates into bawling rock karakoke without getting your own drunken turn. Hopefully it will improve during the month-long residency at the Vaudeville Theatre.

Friday 7th June 2013 Read more...
I'm A Dreamer, Aren't We All: Billy at the Union Theatre

Undertaker's clerk Billy Fisher dreams of being the ruler of Ambrosia and captain of its national football team, Hollywood scriptwriter and lover of movie stars. Everything seems possible for him, and for the show's rising star Keith Ramsay. At the Union Theatre.

Monday 3rd June 2013 Read more...
Platform Performance: Travels With My Aunt at the Menier Chocolate Factory

Christopher Luscombe's production of Giles Havergal's adaptation of Graham Greene's novel and set in an authentic railway station travels hopefully, but does it arrive? Three very fine central performances narrate the plot and illustrate the characters, but by bedtime do you feel as though you've read the story rather than seen a play? At the Menier Chocolate Factory.

Sunday 12th May 2013 Read more...
Flogging A Dead Horse: Desperately Seeking The Exit at Leicester Square Theatre

When your brilliantly conceptualised stage musical combining a cult Madonna movie with the music of Blondie crashes and burns in the hands of incompetent producers, directors and choreographers you turn it into a one-man-show monologue of hilarious anecdotes and pithy backbiting. But what do you do if that fails, turn it into another musical with a backtrack by JLS? At the Leicester Square Theatre.

Tuesday 30th April 2013 Read more...
A satisfying visit to the bog: Irish drama The Weir at the Donmar Warehouse

Conor McPherson's work has been critically elevated to rank with the greatest Irish dramatists, living or dead, and Josie Rourke's authentic and affectionate staging of The Weir gives it just the right amount of breathing space. At the Donmar Warehouse.

Sunday 28th April 2013 Read more...
Chorus of disapproval: On Approval revived, but only just

Not everything has to be a blockbuster: this is a nice little production in a nice little theatre, with a couple of engaging performances by Sara Crowe and Daniel Hill.  It just isn't a very good play. At Jermyn Street Theatre.

Tuesday 16th April 2013 Read more...
Not tonight, Darling: Darling of the Day at the Union Theatre

Almost deserving of a backstage musical about its own production where a company ravaged by flu soldiers on despite all setbacks, this valiant revival of Darling of the Day highlights both the fun and the flaws in what may be Jule Styne's only unsuccessful score. At the Union Theatre.

Monday 25th March 2013 Read more...
A far cry from Kensington: The Winslow Boy at The Old Vic Theatre

Yes, it's the "one about the postal order" back for a fresh airing in the West End in a Lindsay Posner production which plays down the politics but vividly paints the family drama trapped in William Morris-wallpapered stiff-upper-lip genteel domesticity, right down to its french windows and stagey dialogue. At The Old Vic Theatre.

Saturday 23rd March 2013 Read more...
The Mormon Conquest: The Book of Mormon at The Prince of Wales Theatre

With saturation bombing publicity and a £10 million advance, nothing can dent the commercial success of The Book of Mormon, opened at the Prince of Wales theatre after 35 previews. It's certainly the hottest ticket in town, but is it also the Best Musical? At the risk of falling off the bandwagon, here's Johnny Fox's take on it. At The Prince of Wales Theatre.

Friday 22nd March 2013 Read more...
A boy and his dog: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time at the Apollo Theatre

Mark Haddon's sensitive gentle and personal novel The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time explodes on to the stage in a dynamic production which bombards you with sound, light and the fury of an intelligent mind trapped by logic.  You can not miss this.  At the Apollo Theatre.

Monday 18th March 2013 Read more...
The Great British Chekhov: Longing at the Hampstead Theatre

In combining Chekhov's short stories My Life and A Visit to Friends, on which The Cherry Orchard was based, novelist William Boyd has provided an hommage that stops just short of pastiche but affords luxurious opportunities for soul-searching acting, dressed in the dramatic longueurs and birch forests of the genre. At Hampstead Theatre.

Friday 8th March 2013 Read more...
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