Kate Mason

Kate is the Visual Arts and Museums editor for One Stop Arts, and the press coordinator for Bachtrack. Her interests lie mainly in modern and contemporary art, particularly early modernist movements. She has an MA in Modern and Contemporary Literature and Culture from the University of York as well as a BA in English Literature/Philosophy from McGill University in Montreal. Kate is also a banjo player, and sings in both the London Trad Academy's Sea Shanty Choir and the North Camden Chorus.
From raw steel to gilded bronzes: Bill Woodrow at the Royal Academy

Bill Woodrow, a major figure in modern and contemporary British sculpture, is the subject of this comprehensive survey at the Royal Academy, which traces his early development and fascination with sticks, steel and household appliances to his later, less-impressive bronze works.

Monday 11th November 2013 Read more...
Aggressively sexual: Sarah Lucas' SITUATION Absolute Beach Man Rubble at Whitechapel Gallery

Sarah Lucas' retrospective at Whitechapel Gallery is not for the faint-hearted: with rooms full of genitalia, objectified bodies, and bawdy humour, Lucas cements her position as one of the wildest YBAs of the 1990s. Is she a rebel, a misanthrope, or just something in between?

Thursday 7th November 2013 Read more...
Satellite fairs in Shoreditch: The Other Art Fair and Moniker Art Fair, 2013

Joining forces this year in Shoreditch's Old Truman Brewery, The Other Art Fair and Moniker Art Fair showcase work by young, urban artists and offer the chance to get to know the people behind the artworks. Look out for their taxidermy workshops and 3-D printer demonstrations!

Friday 18th October 2013 Read more...
London's Top 10 Quirkiest Museums

If you're bored of dragging the family through the British Museum for the tenth time, maybe it's time to explore some of London's hidden gems. With over 200 museums in the city, there's no excuse for sticking to the big institutions. Here are ten of our favourite museums in London that offer something a little different, from historical cartoons to curiosities from the Freemasons' library. 

Wednesday 16th October 2013 Read more...
Death, flowers, and stuffed foxes: Victoriana: The Art of Revival at the Guildhall Art Gallery

Victoriana: The Art of Revival at the Guildhall Art Gallery celebrates work by artists from the past 20 years that reinterprets or subverts the art and design from Queen Victoria's reign. Charming oddities such as a hair cake and stuffed foxes lend it a humourous, cabinet-of-curiosities air; while works by Yinka Shonibare take a more critical look at Victorian society.

Friday 6th September 2013 Read more...
Miniature worlds in boxes and bell jars: Dream No Small Dreams at Ronchini Gallery

Three artists – Patrick Jacobs, Adrien Broom and Thomas Doyle – work in miniature scale, presenting landscapes and dioramas that throw human endeavour into distorted perspective. Dream No Small Dreams at Ronchini Gallery is a playful look into these tiny worlds full of fantasy and drama.

Friday 6th September 2013 Read more...
BBC Proms Top Five: Final Week

In celebration of the world's biggest classical music festival, here are our Top Five picks from the eighth and final week of the BBC Proms.

Friday 30th August 2013 Read more...
A modern-day economic fable: The Ant and the Grasshopper at Tête à Tête Opera Festival

This Russian-language version of the well-known fable The Ant and the Grasshopper adapts traditional material to a 20th-century opera about the dangers of credit and the economic crisis. Despite strong performances, the action drags in places, and would have benefited from more playfulness and humour.

Sunday 18th August 2013 Read more...
The Crocodile snapped up the laughs at Tête à Tête opera festival

The Crocodile is an operatic take on Dostoevsky's short story about a civil servant who is swallowed whole by – you guessed it – a crocodile. Hilarity ensues in this fantastic piece, heavy on flamboyant costumes and outstanding puppetry. At the Tête à Tête opera festival.

Saturday 17th August 2013 Read more...
Fossils and Monsters at Tête à Tête

This new piece at Tête à Tête: The Opera Festival tells two stories of two undercelebrated 19th-century women, Mary Anning and Mary Shelley, with music from several different composers. It didn't all hang together throughout, but these two Marys are worthy subjects indeed.

Sunday 11th August 2013 Read more...
Vivienne at Tête à Tête

In a one-woman show sung by Clare McCaldin, Vivienne gives voice to T.S. Eliot's much-maligned wife. This contribution to the Tête à Tête opera festival at the Riverside Studios blends elements of music hall song and cleverly interwoven references to Eliot's poetry, to form a fitting tribute to its subject.

Sunday 11th August 2013 Read more...
Soon at Tête à Tête

Based on a narrative poem by Alba Arikha, Soon blends the sung observations of a lone female passenger on a Eurostar train with painterly music. Regrettably, Soon doesn't end soon enough, and the plot lags as it goes on, but its score is well-polished and both the cast and ensemble are strong.

Friday 2nd August 2013 Read more...
Dalí puppets, fluffy bunnies and Jesus Christ Superstar: Gala at the Tête à Tête festival

The story of Salvador Dalí's wife, Gala, is loosely told through opera, puppetry and some fantastic stage antics. Short and rough around the edges, this addition to the Tête à Tête festival more than delivered on its promise of surreal humour.

Friday 2nd August 2013 Read more...
Opera Holland Park unearths a rare gem with I gioielli della Madonna

Opera Holland Park's revival of Ermanno Wolf-Ferrari's Il gioielli della Madonna (directed by Martin Lloyd-Evans; conducted by Peter Robinson) is a strange choice: the opera tells the bizarre story of lust, incest and the stolen jewels of a plaster Madonna in Naples. But strong performances from the cast made for a fully enjoyable evening.

Friday 26th July 2013 Read more...
Fusiform Gyrus at Lisson Gallery

An eclectic collection of contemporary works by fourteen international artists at Lisson Gallery, curated by Raimundas Malašauskas. While many of the works in Fusiform Gyrus are mired in obscure descriptions and wordy titles, the pieces which stand out are those that appeal to the senses, notably Miet Warlop's surreal performances.

Sunday 14th July 2013 Read more...
Shear nostalgia: Peaches performs Yoko Ono's Cut Piece at Meltdown

Nearly 50 years after Yoko Ono invited her Tokyo audience on stage to cut off pieces of her clothing, this seminal performance art piece was reenacted at the Southbank Centre by Canadian electro-pop artist Peaches. But if this 2013 Cut Piece is simply a historical revival, why bother staging it at all? 

Tuesday 18th June 2013 Read more...
Andy Cutting's tuneful melodeon a rare treat at Kings Place

Andy Cutting treated us to traditional music and folk songs on the melodeon in an intimate concert highlighting both his technical skill on this unusual instrument, and his fantastic knowledge of folk music – at Kings Place.

Monday 17th June 2013 Read more...
Venice Biennale 2013: Highlights

Like the seagulls swarming around St Mark's Basilica, the art world flocks to Venice every two years for the Biennale – the biggest exhibition of contemporary art in the world. Kate Mason reports on this year's highlights, from the national pavilions to the city's collateral art events.

Friday 31st May 2013 Read more...
The Biennale for beginners: A Venice F.A.Q.

Critics, curators, and art lovers worldwide are gearing up for the massive international art exhibition opening next week: the Venice Biennale. These two words conjure visions of cutting-edge contemporary art and glittering Italian socialites. But for the art-world outsider, visiting the Biennale can be a daunting prospect. Here's our guide to what you need to know and our top tips for what to see.

Thursday 23rd May 2013 Read more...
Architecture, Design and Art in Italy: Giorgio Casali: Photographer / Domus 1951–1983 at the Estorick Collection

The Estorick Collection displays works by Giorgio Casali, Italian photographer of design and architecture for the style magazine Domus from 1951–1983. Casali's photographs are a testament to his sophisticated genius and his skill in capturing beautifully designed objects.

Wednesday 22nd May 2013 Read more...
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