Sarah Brooks

Sarah graduated in English from Trinity College Dublin with a keen interest in art. Whilst studying she began writing art reviews for the university newspaper and enjoys exploring a wide range of artists. Perpetually intrigued by Abstract Expressionism, she also has a particular interest in painters of the Belle Époque: a long-standing favourite is Toulouse-Lautrec.
The Royal Academy of Arts

The Royal Academy of Arts is a beautiful, grandiose venue, particularly renown for its impressive touring, temporary exhibitions which always attract the crowds. The Academy also has a long established architectural history and for anyone with an interest in this discipline, it is a must-see.

Wednesday 7th December 2011 Read more...
A Hankering after Ghosts: Charles Dickens and the Supernatural

Dickens constantly suspended his readers between psychological and supernatural explanations, and this exhibition goes far to explain the reasons behind the writer’s continual fascination with unexplained phenomena. With a section on his Christmas novels, A Hankering after Ghosts is an enjoyably festive, literary treat.

Thursday 1st December 2011 Read more...
Electroboutique pop-up at the Science Museum

“Creative consumption” is very much the buzz word of this exhibition: Electroboutique’s art demands that you stop being a passive art consumer but become part of the artistic process instead. At the Science Museum.

Wednesday 23rd November 2011 Read more...
Hidden Heroes: The Genius of Everyday Things

The new exhibition at the Science Museum delivers exactly what its celebratory title implies: a comprehensive examining of ‘the genius of everyday things’, invaluable items that we take for granted.

Wednesday 16th November 2011 Read more...
The First Actresses - Nell Gwyn to Sarah Siddons

This exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery is designed to show the close relationship that existed between art and theatre in the late 17th and early 18th century: it demonstrates that portraiture became a kind of performance in itself, as it set out to enhance the reputations of early actresses, avert scandal, and crucially develop their professional identities. 

Friday 21st October 2011 Read more...
The Dulwich Picture Gallery

Dulwich Picture Gallery has a unique reputation as England’s first public art gallery: the attractive 1811 building has influenced the design of art galleries ever since with its series of interlinking rooms lit naturally through skylights. There are around 350 paintings on permanent display, mostly organised by nationality of the artist.

Tuesday 4th October 2011 Read more...
The British Library in London

The permanent display at the British Library is astonishing. Literature lovers will be in their element, as will historians, theologians, musicians and anyone who has an interest in the evolution of print over time. 

Monday 3rd October 2011 Read more...
The Design Museum

The Design Museum opened in 1989 in a converted banana warehouse overlooking the Thames, with a focus on design from the 20th century onwards. The Design Museum covers the evolution of design over a broad spectrum, with exhibitions that are changed around every four months.

Friday 30th September 2011 Read more...
The Wallace Collection in London

In close proximity to a bustling, hectic, Oxford Street, there exists a tranquil square with a truly unique museum – The Wallace Collection. Since 1900, it has existed as a free national museum which is home to an impressive collection of artwork, an exquisite selection of furniture and porcelain and even a world class armoury.

Friday 30th September 2011 Read more...
Barry Flanagan: Early Works 1965 - 1982

The current exhibition at the Tate Britain concentrates on the artist’s playful and inventive manipulation of unusual materials in his early works. The exhibition aims to show that there exists a consistency throughout Flanagan’s early work which crosses over into the later bronze works for which he is most famous. 

Wednesday 28th September 2011 Read more...
The National Portrait Gallery

The National Portrait Gallery covers portraiture in a variety of media: painting, sculpture, photography and video. The gallery owns more than 160,000 portraits of famous British men and women from the 16th century to the present day. There is a portrait representing virtually every kind of career that has existed in the public eye throughout British history.

Sunday 25th September 2011 Read more...
The National Gallery

The National Gallery is the number one destination for anyone interested in Western European painting from the 13th to the early 20th century. Within this niche, it excels. Its collection of art is housed in the most beautiful of surroundings; elaborate marble pillars, ornamented arches, high ceilings, and walls covered with richly patterned wallpaper.

Friday 23rd September 2011 Read more...
Tate Britain

The focus of Tate Britain is on British art from 1500 onwards. There is a remarkable section on the Romantics and in particular J.M.W. Turner (the Tate holds the largest collection of his work in the world). In addition, the BP British Art Displays ensure that a wide range of 20th century artists are also on display.

Thursday 22nd September 2011 Read more...
The National Maritime Museum

British naval history is the predominant focus of the National Maritime Museum. Attention is drawn towards Britain’s identity as an island, with the surrounding oceans acting both as bridge and barrier. The Museum's many sections each illuminate an aspect of Britain's relationship with the sea.

Wednesday 21st September 2011 Read more...
The Science Museum in London

The Science Museum provides a wealth of information in a thoroughly engaging and increasingly technological manner. It's an exhilarating place to visit, and organised over five floors, it is just the right size that everything can easily be seen in a day. 

Tuesday 20th September 2011 Read more...
The Tate Modern in London

The Tate Modern has flourished since its opening in May 2000 to become an important and distinctive cultural landmark upon the Thames. The Tate Modern is the place to go to see modern art – that is, work from around 1900 onwards.

Monday 19th September 2011 Read more...
The British Museum in London

With 6 million artefacts from cultures spanning the globe, both past and present, the British Museum in London is the number one most visited attraction in the UK, with over five million visitors per year. It is almost guaranteed that you will feel compelled to return for many more visits.

Monday 19th September 2011 Read more...
The Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) in London

The Victoria and Albert Museum (known universally to Londoners as the "V&A") sets high standards by advertising itself as the world's greatest museum of art and design. It's a reputation that it appears to deserve. Entering the V&A is like entering a palace full of the most beautifully elaborate, ornate, objects and, as would be expected, copious amounts of artwork. 

Monday 19th September 2011 Read more...


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