Caitlin McDonald

Caitlin holds a PhD in Arab and Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter. She is the author of a book on her findings about the international belly dance community (Global Moves: Belly Dance as an Extra/Ordinary Space to Explore Social Paradigms in Egypt and Around the World) and has edited a collected volume of essays from scholars around the world on the same subject (Belly Dance Around the World: New Communities, Performance and Identity). You can follow her blog where she covers topics ranging from dance to data science.
Shining Darkly: Mucky Kid at Theatre503

Richly tragic viewing, Mucky Kid uses the tale of an escaped convict to explore themes about child protection, abuse, mental illness, coming of age and fear of the unforgivable impulses within. At Theatre 503.

Saturday 16th November 2013 Read more...
The Wit and Wisdom of Perfect Nonsense at the Duke of York's Theatre

In Perfect Nonsense Matthew Macfadyen, Stephen Mangan and Mark Hadfield serve up – on a silver platter – an evening of dulcet-toned, dinner-jacketed fun. Robert and David Goodale provide a fresh and lively take on the much beloved Wodehouse characters Jeeves and Wooster. At the Duke of York's Theatre.

Thursday 14th November 2013 Read more...
A Rave for Beats at the Soho Theatre

A thoughtful, imaginative and minimalist Glaswegian production, Beats asks us to consider the meaning of music in all its resonant layers. At the Soho Theatre.

Wednesday 16th October 2013 Read more...
Cosy contemporary playwriting: City Slices & Country Crumbs

For a solidly entertaining hour in a low-key environment, City Slices & Country Crumbs serves well. New writing by four women around the country makes this an interesting look at contemporary English theatre. At the Hen and Chickens Theatre.

Tuesday 24th September 2013 Read more...
Compelling but Confusing: The Secret Agent at the Young Vic

A stylish, energetic production, Theatre O's The Secret Agent at the Young Vic is resonant with topical yet timeless questions on political liberties and national security. Themes of exploitation and nihilism contribute to a growing claustrophobia as the show unfolds.

Friday 13th September 2013 Read more...
Powerful Contemporary Relevance: Blue Stockings at Shakespeare's Globe

In a time when young women are still shot in the head for pursuing the right to an education, the conflicts explored in Jessica Swale's first play, Blue Stockings, could not be more urgent. John Dove directs a witty and rousing production at Shakespeare's Globe.

Monday 2nd September 2013 Read more...
A Beautiful Dream: Go to Sleep, Goddamnit! at Camden People's Theatre

The Krumple's inaugural offering in London is sweet, touching and very funny. Here's hoping it won't be the last. Go to Sleep, Goddamnit! is their first show and it roars onto the stage without speaking a single word. At the Camden People's Theatre.

Wednesday 21st August 2013 Read more...
Top of the Class: The Other School at St. James Theatre

Thoughtful, boisterous and poignant, The Other School is an enjoyable collaboration between National Youth Music Theatre, Dougal Irvine and Dominic Marsh at the St. James Theatre.

Friday 16th August 2013 Read more...
Struggling to make itself heard: Lend Me Your Ears at the Canal Cafe Theatre

Written by Victoria Grantham, there are some strong moments in Lend Me Your Ears. For starters, the play is both topical and timeless, in that it discusses Russell Brand being excorigated in the media for a verbal faux pas about sex. But it hovers at an awkward place between realism and absurdity which ultimately dulls the message. At Canal Cafe Theatre.

Wednesday 14th August 2013 Read more...
Sizzling: Bryan Batt's Batt on a Hot Tin Roof at Crazy Coqs

Have you ever wanted to be propelled back to an era of long white gloves and cigarette holders? Coiffed hairdos, dinner jackets, highballs poured from silver cocktail shakers? Plush banquettes with little round tables that have candles on them? Then, my friend, the Crazy Coqs is for you. Bryan Batt's New Orleans-inspired show Batt on a Hot Tin Roof enlivens the venue with true Broadway razzle-dazzle.

Friday 9th August 2013 Read more...
Clean, Sharp Comic Work: Immaculate at the White Bear Theatre

Thundermaker's Immaculate is a hilarious and clever look at the problem of approaching the supernatural in modern-day life. Is there still room for elevated notions of the soul, divinity, and the existential problem of free will in a world of flat-pack furniture and irritating mobile phone ringtones? Or will it turn out these questions are inescapable no matter how prosaic our surroundings? At the White Bear Theatre Club.

Friday 9th August 2013 Read more...
Still on the Shelf: Shelf Life: Lotta Quizeen's ABC of Home Management at Battersea Arts Centre

Katie Richardson's Lotta Quizeen is a charming pastiche of several female TV cooking show presenters. Shelf Life features some fun ribald interactive party games but ultimately struggles to keep its energy up. At the Battersea Arts Centre.

Wednesday 7th August 2013 Read more...
Open Your Eyes to Very Still and Hard to See by Steve Yockey at the Etcetera Theatre

BeLT's Very Still and Hard to See builds a dark ambience from a thoughtful script by Steve Yockey. While the premise is an encounter with an external manifestation of evil, as the show progresses it becomes clear that it is actually an exploration of the evil already existing within ourselves. At the Etcetera Theatre.

Monday 5th August 2013 Read more...
The Bellicose Beauty of Penthesilea at the Space

In a time when social expectations of the female body in public space seem a particularly vexed issue at the forefront of the public imagination, Penthesilea opens vital space for exploring how those expectations might be reimagined. It also begs the question of what we really mean when we say a loved one is so adorable we could just eat them right up. At the Space.

Tuesday 30th July 2013 Read more...
In with a roar, out with a sigh: The Hush at the Shed, National Theatre

With a stunningly creative team at the helm, The Hush should have been an exultant triumph of theatre. Created by master electronic sound artist Matthew Herbert, National Theatre associate director and writer Ben Power and foley artists Barnaby Smyth and Ruth Sullivan, The Hush included some standout gratifying moments. But I left feeling the concept was grander than the execution. At the Shed, National Theatre.

Thursday 25th July 2013 Read more...
Lights up on Dickie Beau: Blackouts at Soho Theatre

At the Soho Theatre, Dickie Beau evokes beautiful and dangerous pictures of two of our most famous screen idols, Marilyn Monroe and Judy Garland. This production asks us to revisit our memories of these larger-than-life figures and tear back the curtain – or slap on the greasepaint.

Wednesday 24th July 2013 Read more...
The Heart-Stealing The Strange Undoing of Prudencia Hart at the London Welsh Centre

If someone were to design a piece of theatre expressly for me, it could not have been more to my taste than The Strange Undoing of Prudencia Hart. Strong in all production areas, David Greig's writing supports creative and energetic performances from Melody Grove, Paul McCole, David McKay, Annie Grace and Alasdair Macrae. Wils Wilson's direction makes this production at the London Welsh Centre a delight to behold.

Wednesday 17th July 2013 Read more...
Where there's life, there's hope: what happens to the hope at the end of the evening at the Almeida Festival

In which two middle-aged men take a knowing glance at the changing nature of their friendship, the thing that is theatre, and the myriad shades of meaning that can be ascribed to the word "mate". Tim Crouch and Andy Smith provide a thoughtful opening to the Almeida Festival.

Monday 15th July 2013 Read more...
Dying laughing: Fitzrovia Radio Hour's Undead! Unloved! Unsolved! at the Horse Hospital

Watching the Fitzrovia Radio ensemble pad around on slippered feet at the Horse Hospital creating sound-pictures would make anyone want to be a foley artist. The dulcet sultry tones of Natalie Ball display admirable dexterity. Dan Starkey's Dutch grammar-disordered Abraham van Helsing in "Bram Stoker's Dracula" deserves special mention.

Sunday 7th July 2013 Read more...
Shakespeare in the cemetery? Twelfth Night at Abney Park Cemetery

In the green wilds of Abney Park Cemetery, Kelly Eva-May endowed Viola with an elegiac tenderness for Orsino, keenly expressing a desire felt all the more deeply for its denial. Alex Southern's Orsino had a languid sensuality highlighting the capriciousness of his character's disbelief that women could ever be as constant or feel as deeply as men. Comedically, Daniel Osgerby shone as a deliciously pretentious Malvolio.

Saturday 6th July 2013 Read more...
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