Ann Dingli

Ann stepped with eyes blinking out of the Maltese sun in September of 2011 to begin an MA in Design Writing Criticism at the University of the Arts London. Her background is in Art History, having read for the subject at BA and MA level at the University of Malta. Ann's writings focus mainly on art and architectural criticism. She enjoys eating, writing, and eavesdropping. You can read her blog at criticalspeak.wordpress.com.
A different side to Freud: Lucian Freud Etchings at the Courtauld Gallery

A collection of etchings at the Courtauld Gallery reveals Lucian Freud's expert draughtsmanship and a corner of his mind that has hitherto been neglected. This exhibition is highly recommended for a fresh look at one of Britain's most important artists.

Wednesday 21st November 2012 Read more...
The Northern Renaissance at the Queen's Gallery

The Northern Renaissance: Dürer to Holbein consolidates the definition of Northern Renaissance by presenting works by some of its greatest artists. This show is lucid and detailed in its presentation, and a joy to anyone who is captivated by the true definition of "fine" art.

Tuesday 6th November 2012 Read more...
Mantegna to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Courtauld Gallery

The joy of the Courtauld Gallery is elevated to a sublime degree with the guest appearance of a show called Mantegna to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Courtauld Gallery - which may become the quiet highlight of the summer season.

Wednesday 27th June 2012 Read more...
Wonderful World? Gérard Rancinan at Londonewcastle Project Space

Photography by Gérard Rancinan, intended to be pitched somewhere between comedy and tragedy, illustrates an imagined reality where human beings become obsessed with money, fame and manufactured happiness. The exhibition's meaning, however, lies very clearly at surface level.

Sunday 10th June 2012 Read more...
The Twelfth Serpentine Pavilion – Herzog, de Mueron, WeiWei

The new pavilion is the result of a collaborative venture involving architects Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron, and artist Ai Weiwei. The intention of the pavilion’s design is to take visitors beneath the Serpentine’s lawn, to explore the hidden history of its previous pavilions. It is pleasant and peaceful, but does it come across as much more than an elevated pond?

Friday 1st June 2012 Read more...
Two Weeks One Summer – Damien Hirst and Bruce Nauman at the White Cube

The warm walk to the White Cube in Bermonsdey is certainly worth taking should anyone be interested in viewing a more contemplative side to Damien Hirst’s oeuvre: here a selection of his recent oil paintings are on display. The Bruce Nauman portion to the show is a gratifying addition and the highlight of the show. 

Thursday 24th May 2012 Read more...
Leonardo da Vinci at the Queen's Gallery

The neatly curated show at the Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace, is said to be the largest exhibition to date showing da Vinci’s studies of the human body. In a clear and uncomplicated manner, it gives an idea of the thoughts that filtered through da Vinci’s mind as he investigated the make-up of the human body.

Monday 14th May 2012 Read more...
Bauhaus: Art as Life at the Barbican Art Gallery

This exhibition's scope, though logistically and spatially immense, is pleasantly simple: it seeks to uncover the basic trends that underlined the ethos of the Bauhaus teaching, in a linear and composed manner. However, the spirit of Bauhaus design and way of life is somewhat absent.

Friday 4th May 2012 Read more...
Ron Mueck at the Hauser and Wirth Gallery

Ron Mueck's exhibition at the Hauser and Wirth gallery is a stunning display of sculptural ability. Punching realism into the third dimension, his four-piece exhibition is emotionally accessible and will have many breathing a sigh of intellectual relief.

Thursday 26th April 2012 Read more...
Matthew Monahan Stirs the Senses at the Stuart Shave Modern Art Gallery

This show is a profound description of the characteristics of bronze as a sculptural material. Monahan's quest is to explore the notion of dimensionality, specifically within a museum or gallery context, and to break down the sculpture/display dynamic is definitely worth experiencing.

Thursday 19th April 2012 Read more...
A British home, a worldly experience – At Home with the World at the Geffrye Museum

A charming exhibition at the Geffrye Museum of the Home pays tribute to the British penchant for letting foreign cultures seep into the fabric of their homes. The exhibition goes through 400 years of homemaking trends in Britain, beginning with the first infiltration of eating implements, and ending with the age of vacuum cleaners and the first Macintosh computers.

Saturday 14th April 2012 Read more...
Karin Ruggaber at Greengrassi

Karin Ruggaber's 'sculptured paintings' are a reasonably elegant display of monotonality, devoid of any visual punctuation. Ruggaber’s works do not claim to possess meaning – so much so that the general feeling of this exhibition is one of ambiguity. For those who do not need to be directed round a gallery, however, this is a visually-enticing investment.

Wednesday 4th April 2012 Read more...
Between Private and Public: Gillian Wearing at the Whitechapel Gallery

How do we distinguish the back stage from the front stage of our lives? What does the space between the public and private areas of our consciousness look like? Gillian Wearing’s first major survey at the Whitechapel Gallery in East London answers this question in a manner which is at once haunting and entirely captivating.

Tuesday 27th March 2012 Read more...
A Place to Call Home: Where we live and why

With this exhibition, A Place to Call Home: Where We Live and Why, the Royal Institute of British Architects has provided an in-depth and historically rich account of the evolution of the British home from the eighteenth century up until the present.

Monday 26th March 2012 Read more...


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