Adam Tait

Adam Tait is an Entertainment and Culture journalist, Deputy Editor of Shout4Music and a writer for The 405 and Gigwise.
Prom 62: Django Bates impresses with a celebration of Charlie Parker

Django Bates, returning to the Royal Albert Hall with his trio Belovèd 26 years after he last appeared there, is determinedly inventive, and well-versed in reconsidering Charlie Parker's jazz works. Prom 62 was a wonderful example of Parker's musical influence.

Friday 30th August 2013 Read more...
Henri-Pierre Noel's belated London debut at the Jazz Cafe in Camden

Haitian jazz pianist Henri-Piere Noel's debut UK performance took place last Saturday at the Camden Jazz Cafe. This great musician, who released two rare albums in the 70s, is still full of life. With any luck, much more music lies ahead.

Thursday 18th July 2013 Read more...
Amy Winehouse: A Family Portrait at the Jewish Museum, London

The Jewish Museum in Camden presents a new exhibition about the late singer and Jewish North London-native, Amy Winehouse. Co-curated by her brother Alex and sister-in-law Riva, the exhibition reminds us of the person and family behind her stage presence and sensationalised tabloid reports.

Monday 8th July 2013 Read more...
Bang a gun: Shoot! Existential Photography at the Photographers' Gallery

Shoot! traces the history of the shooting gallery as attraction, and its souvenir photographs, through a philosophical lens. Playing on the relationship between shooting a photograph and shooting a gun, these fascinating images encapsulate the violence of both shattered lenses and targets. At The Photographers' Gallery.

Wednesday 31st October 2012 Read more...
Sublime, intense tranquility: Rothko and Sugimoto's Dark Paintings and Seascapes at Pace Gallery London

In a serene, largely monochrome set of works, Mark Rothko and Hiroshi Sugimoto portray still seascapes and horizons. While there is a limited number of Rothko paintings on display, Sugimoto's works are sublime and clean, with an intense stillness and tranquility: it is worth a trip to Pace Gallery for these alone.

Wednesday 24th October 2012 Read more...
Aspen Magazine: 1965-1971 at Whitechapel Gallery

Aspen Magazine: 1965-1971 at Whitechapel Gallery provides a wealth of information on the multimedia magazine, whose contributors and designers included Andy Warhol, Yoko Ono, John Cage, Roland Barthes and Susan Sontag. It can be difficult to wade through the displays if you are unfamiliar with the magazine, but they capture the magazine's innovative approach to publishing.

Tuesday 23rd October 2012 Read more...
Prix Pictet at the Saatchi Gallery

The Prix Pictet prize for photography is one of the most prestigious competitions, and showcases some beautiful works at the Saatchi Gallery. Some of the works veer towards the mundane and are more concerned with politics than aesthetics. But other pieces are truly stunning and moving images that deserve a wider audience.

Friday 19th October 2012 Read more...
Eric Bainbridge – Steel Sculptures / Simon Martin - UR Feeling

Simon Bainbridge displays his aesthetically and conceptually interesting works of reclaimed steel and three-dimensional collage; and Simon Martin's collection of works by other artists examine our attitudes towards our built surroundings. Both artists present compelling ideas – but it's a shame there are not more works on display to flesh out the exhibition.

Friday 5th October 2012 Read more...
Art of Change: New Directions from China at Hayward Gallery

Art Of Change: New Directions From China seeks to reflect the transformative nature of Chinese history with works by nine of China's foremost installation and performance artists. The exhibition sheds light on issues in the Chinese artistic community, and although occasionally these messages are somewhat hard to access, it provides viewers with intriguing food for thought.

Monday 10th September 2012 Read more...
Tino Sehgal: Tate Modern

Tino Sehgal's art is known for its dynamism and interactive nature. These Associations, his latest piece filling the Tate's Turbine Hall, is a fascinatingly engaging work that drags the spectator into it. You could quite easily sit watching these movements and interactions for hours on end. A truly fantastic experience that everyone should have at least once. 

Friday 27th July 2012 Read more...
Quentin Blake: As Large as Life at the Foundling Museum

Quentin Blake’s scratchy, vibrant renderings are for many a quintessential representation of childhood. The Foundling Museum’s exhibition displays his paintings for hospitals, each of which are produced with a remarkable sensitivity to its audience, and a tenderness and care that make him an endearing and engaging artist for all ages.

Friday 24th February 2012 Read more...
Mondrian and Nicholson: Courtauld

The works of Mondrian and Nicholson, heads of the De Stijl movement, are presented in parallel. The focus of an exhibition is, obviously, the works of art. But often, the artist is left to hang like a spectre in the background. In Parallel is an opportunity to see these artists humanised in the light of a friendship that was important to both men and their work.

Friday 17th February 2012 Read more...
Damien Hirst's Spot Paintings

Damien Hirst’s spots have become unbelievably familiar in our culture, and they have reached such ubiquity that they are now a source of resentment for many art fans. How can so many works, seemingly created with dispassion, deserve to be so comprehensively exhibited? Can the very fact that there are so many of them, displayed the world over, be considered an artistic achievement?

Thursday 16th February 2012 Read more...
David Shrigley: Hayward Gallery

Shrigley’s work adopts a surrealist style in its examination of mental goings on. Brain Activity almost feels like being shown around an eccentric friend’s home: it is littered with oddities so strange that further explanation would actually seem out of place. But Shrigley's innate wit and direct remarks make for an especially pleasant and accessible experience.

Tuesday 14th February 2012 Read more...
Alberto Burri: Form and Matter

The Estorick’s exhibition is a fascinating gateway to Alberto Burri's theoretical approach to the purpose and meaning of art. Burri's non-tradational materials and vibrant red colours can make his works seem harsh and volatile. But it is the behaviour and qualities of the materials, and how the artist achieved them, that form the meaning of Burri’s art. 

Monday 13th February 2012 Read more...
David Hepher at Flowers Gallery

David Hepher’s Lace, Concrete and Glass commemorates the 1960s housing project, Aylesbury Estate. While the stories of individuals seem just out of reach, what is emphasised in these works is the estate’s presence in the city. But can a building with so much history as the Aylesbury ever escape its social aspects? 

Wednesday 8th February 2012 Read more...
Royal Manuscripts: The Genius of Illumination

Royal Manuscripts offers the chance to see some of the oldest books of the European middle ages, and to get an idea of what medieval Europe and its monarchs were like. There is a total romanticism to the exhibition -- a sense of the mythic and the legendary which leaves you desperate to know more.

Wednesday 25th January 2012 Read more...
Zarina Bhimji

Whitechapel Gallery's exhibition of Zarina Bhimji's photography shows the artist's concern with the marks left by human activity, their routes, and the links between places and people. As an examination of channels between cultures, it is fascinating. But the lack of human subjects lends these images an incredible stillness.

Thursday 19th January 2012 Read more...
Anselm Kiefer: II Mistero delle Cattedrali

Kiefer’s work reminds us of the bilateral relationship the organic and inorganic have with each other. Each is inevitably affected by the other; both are transformed by this relationship. It is this inevitable transformation that forms the focus of Kiefer’s work and it is this focus that makes the exhibition so irresistibly compelling.

Friday 13th January 2012 Read more...
George Condo: Mental States at the Hayward Gallery

An exhibition titled ‘Mental Spaces’ perhaps elicits connotations and expectations of somewhat serious, inward pointing contemplations. But ascending the stairs to the collection of Condo’s work you find something altogether more jocular. The Hayward’s exhibition spans Condo’s career from its inception in the 1980s right up until the present day, although not in any chronological structure.

Monday 7th November 2011 Read more...
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